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Sensitive but Unclassified

Sensitive but Unclassified (SBU) information is unclassified information or material determined by the federal government to require special protection to preclude unauthorized disclosure. The term and marking CUI (Controlled Unclassified Information) will eventually replace SBU in U.S. government agencies. NASA will continue to use SBU until CUI is fully implemented; see NID 1600.55.  Similar government markings include For Official Use Only (FOUO) and Administratively Controlled Information (ACI).

Applies to:

  • Documents received from NASA and other U.S. government agencies
  • Documents created by JPL employees containing excerpts or otherwise derived from a document previously marked as restricted by NASA and other U.S. government agencies
  • Documents specified by written instructions from an appropriate third party

Authorized to Mark Information:

  • NASA and other U.S. government agencies
  • The author of a document derived from another document marked as restricted by NASA and other U.S. government agencies
  • The document author when given written instructions to do so

Authorized to Remove Marking:

  • NASA and other U.S. government agencies

Marking Language:

Condition

Marking

No Specific Guidance is Provided (Title Page) Use the Sensitive but Unclassified cover sheet (printed on yellow paper)
No Specific Guidance is Provided (Subsequent Pages) SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED (SBU)
Specific Guidance is Provided As detailed in guidance

Marking Placement:

Documents with distinct pages: The top or bottom of each page

Documents without distinct pages: At the beginning and end of each document

Handling Requirements:

Authorized to Access:

Access to Government Restricted information of any kind is limited to JPL employees and others as defined in the contract or nondisclosure agreement (NDA).

Further access or redistribution requires agreement of the third party.

For more information, see Prepare a Nondisclosure Agreement (Rule 65192)

Storage:

When left unattended, Government Restricted information must be stored in a secure, access restricted environment. For example:

  • A locked drawer or file cabinet, or behind locked doors
  • If these documents are on display (such as common engineering areas), those displays must be in secured, badge access areas
  • Electronic documents must be placed in restricted access location or be encrypted
  • Extra copies kept for reference or convenience must be shredded or destroyed via JPL Discreet Destruction

Transmission:

When sending Government Restricted information by mail, the document must be packaged in a sealed, opaque envelope or container with no markings to indicate that it contains restricted-access information.

Quoting Excerpts:

Excerpts taken from a Government Restricted document that are inserted into JPL-generated documents must retain the marking from the Government Restricted document.

news-and-eventsnews-and-events

EJournals on Science Data and Data Science

Following is a list of journals from the JPL Library collection related to science data and data science:

All of the full text journals need to be accessed within the JPL network.  When you are at home or off-site, be sure to use Browser Remote Access (RAS) to tap into JPL network first.  You can set up Table-of-Contents alerts for any of the journals from the publishers’ web sites.  Contact the JPL Library Reference Desk (ext 4-4200 or library@jpl.nasa.gov) for assistance or comments regarding any library services or resources.

"Discovery AND Validation OF Kepler-452b" From The Astronomical Journal

One of the hottest news in late July is NASA’s announcement of the discovery of an earth-like planet, Kepler 425b.  Hundreds of news articles have been written and published, from CNN to Scientific American, space.com to NPR. Here is the link to the original, peer-reviewed paper from The Astronomical Journal:

DISCOVERY AND VALIDATION OF Kepler-452b: A 1.6 R? SUPER EARTH EXOPLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE OF A G2 STAR.

The Astronomical Journal, vol 150, no.2, August 2015

Related dates:  Received 2015 March 3, accepted for publication 2015 May 23

Published 2015 July 23 in the August 2015 issue

 

Journals in Environmental Sciences and Ecology

With JPL Library’s new addition of the ProQuest Natural Science Collection, we have access to the full text of many more journals in environmental sciences and ecology.  Here is a list of journals from various publishers.

According to Web of Knowledge, the following journals all have impact factors over 10! This means that, on average, each article published in these journals have been cited more than 10 times within two years of publication.

The following journals also have impact factors between 2 and 10, and they are all available via JPL Library’s subscriptions:

All of the full text journals need to be accessed within the JPL network.  When you are at home or off-site, be sure to use Browser Remote Access (RAS) to tap into JPL network first.  You can set up Table-of-Contents alerts for any of the journals from the publishers’ web sites.  Contact the JPL Library Reference Desk (ext 4-4200 or library@jpl.nasa.gov) for assistance or comments regarding any library services or resources.

 

AGU Books are Online Now!

For over 85 years, American Geophysical Union has published books that are relevant to the professional needs of working scientists and to the larger Earth and space science community.  JPL Library is happy to announce that we have purchased the electronic book collection from AGU for our scientists and all JPLers. This collection contains more than 600 books published from mid-twentieth century to 2014.

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Aug 6, 12:00-1:00 Open Developer's Meetup

Monthly meet up of JPL open developers. Contact David Mittman for more information.

July 29, 2:00-2:45, 3D Printing, Interns, and Innovation

The 3-D printers at the Hub have been buzzing this Summer, several interns have been using them extensively. The finished products range from curious to amazing. Mary Bessell with the Planetary Surface Instruments Group, and Juliana Martinez with IT Technology and Innovation Group will present what they have been exploring with the technology and what they have accomplished. Others are welcome to join in the conversation.

This session will be held on the South side of the Hub (111-104), in front of the 3D printers.

July 28, 12:00-1:00, Summer Movie: The Stuff of Dreams

The Stuff of Dreams

In late 2013, JPL’s Voyager 1 spacecraft reached the space between the stars—the first time a human-made object has ever gone beyond the breath of our sun’s wind. What is more is that, this is not the first “first” record that Voyager has made. Since their commencement in 1977, the twin Voyager spacecraft have made numerous “firsts”. However, what isn’t widely known is that the project almost never got off the ground.

Written, produced and directed by Blaine Baggett, JPL’s Director for Communications and Education, “The Stuff of Dreams” describes the challenges mission managers and the lab had to face developing and launching the twin Voyager spacecraft and operating them during the encounters with Jupiter and Saturn. Through first-hand accounts of those who were there, the film shows how the mission and JPL survived times of uncertainty and debate about the future of the U.S. space program and managed to fly the smartest robots of that age on the most ambitious planetary tour ever designed.

July 22, 4:00-5:00 PM, JPL Stories: Larry James

JPL Stories Presents:

The Early Days of GPS: My Time as a Shuttle Payload Specialist

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Presented by: Larry James, JPL Deputy Director

Wednesday, July 22, 2015, 4:00-5:00 PM

@ the HUB, Building 111-104

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GPS (Global Positioning System) is now an indispensable worldwide utility. However, the early days of GPS were both technically and politically challenging. Larry was selected as the Air Force Shuttle Payload Specialist to fly with the first operational GPS satellite. Come hear about the growth of GPS, the Payload Specialist program, and the impact the Challenger disaster had on the overall program.

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The JPL Stories program, sponsored by the Library, Archives, and Records Section, celebrates the Lab’s unique environment and history, and provides an informal way for JPLers to share their stories with each other. For more information about the JPL Stories series, if you have a JPL story to tell, or if you have suggestions for future stories, contact Teresa Bailey, x49233.

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