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Templates for Most Common
Restricted Information Documents

Office 2011 (These are in document format per users’ request; you may save on your system in Office template format if you desire. These templates have the “short” markings; further options can be found in the Rule – link below. Click on the icon for the marking you wish to use. Select the “Save As” option to download the template to your desktop.)
JPL Markings
Word
Excel
PowerPoint
Administrative Documents
JPL/Caltech Business Discreet
Word Icon
Excel Icon
Powerpoint Icon
JPL/Caltech Business Discreet + Privacy Word 2007 Icon Excel 2007 Icon Powerpoint 2007 Icon
JPL/Caltech Business Discreet + Not Reviewed for Export Control Word 2007 Icon Excel 2007 Icon Powerpoint 2007 Icon
JPL/Caltech Business Discreet + Proposal Sensitive Word 2007 Icon Excel 2007 Icon Powerpoint 2007 Icon
Technical Documents
JPL/Caltech Proprietary
Word 2007 Icon
Excel 2007 Icon
Powerpoint 2007 Icon
JPL/Caltech Proprietary + Not Reviewed for Export Control
Word 2007 Icon
Excel 2007 Icon
Powerpoint 2007 Icon
JPL/Caltech Proprietary + Proposal Sensitive
Word 2007 Icon
Excel 2007 Icon
Powerpoint 2007 Icon
 For more information, see Rule (DocId) 77806
U.S. Government Markings
(NASA) Sensitive But Unclassified (SBU):
Use cover sheet at http://server-mpo.arc.nasa.gov/Services/NEFS/NEF_PDFData/NF1686.pdf printed on Yellow paper
(NOTES: you must login with your NASA agency ID to use the above link; right click to download the linked file NF1686.
)
Word 2007 Icon
Excel 2007 Icon
Powerpoint 2007 Icon
For Official Use Only (FOUO): Word Icon Excel Icon Powerpoint Icon
For additional information contact Sara Tompson or Dan Phipps

Training Materials

  • Best practices:
    • Mark your document right from the start!  So that even the draft reads “JPL/Caltech Business Discreet,” or whichever marking is appropriate.
    • If you must share your slidedecks, we strongly urge you to share in PDF format and without your notes!
    • Link to a restricted information documents via email, etc.; do not attach the document!  Easiest way to keep restricted access documents restricted.
  • Marking & Handling Overview presentation slides
  • Overview one-pager
  • Marking and Handling and Subcontractors presentation slides
  • The required training to access Sensitive but Unclassified (SBU) materials is available on JPL’s Learning Management System. To access the training:

news-and-eventsnews-and-events

Recent EBooks on Light and Optics

August 24th, 2016

All ebooks can be accessed and downloaded from within the JPL network. Our licenses with the publishers prevent further re-distribution, so if you would like to recommend your colleagues to read any of the ebooks, please ask them to download a copy themselves. For questions and comments, please contact the JPL Library Reference Desk at library@jpl.nasa.gov, ext 4-4200, or leave a comment here.

Leadership and Team Work

August 10th, 2016

All ebooks can be accessed and downloaded from within the JPL network. Our licenses with the publishers prevent further re-distribution, so if you would like to recommend your colleagues to read any of the ebooks, please ask them to download a copy themselves. For questions and comments, please contact the JPL Library Reference Desk at library@jpl.nasa.gov, ext 4-4200, or leave a comment here.

Nanomaterials: Recent EBooks

August 10th, 2016

All ebooks can be accessed and downloaded from within the JPL network. Our licenses with the publishers prevent further re-distribution, so if you would like to recommend your colleagues to read any of the ebooks, please ask them to download a copy themselves. For questions and comments, please contact the JPL Library Reference Desk at library@jpl.nasa.gov, ext 4-4200, or leave a comment here.

Astrobiology: Updated List of Ebooks

July 29th, 2016

Astrobiology is the study of the origin, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe; astrobiology addresses the question of whether life exists beyond Earth, and how humans can detect it if it does. This is a growing field, and many books have been published within the last ten years. Following are ebooks available from JPL Library’s collection:

All ebooks can be accessed and downloaded from within the JPL network. Our licenses with the publishers prevent further re-distribution, so if you would like to recommend your colleagues to read any of the ebooks, please ask them to download a copy themselves. For questions and comments, please contact the JPL Library Reference Desk at library@jpl.nasa.gov, ext 4-4200, or leave a comment here.

July 1- August 15, Trial Access to Scopus and SciVal

July 7th, 2016

The JPL Library is evaluating the usefulness of Scopus and SciVal between July 1st and August 15 2016. We would like to have as many JPLers as possible try it and let us know your thoughts about these analytical services.

What are Scopus and SciVal?

  • Scopus is a very large reference and abstract database for peer-reviewed and academic literature in all disciplines, from science, engineering, medicine, to social sciences and humanities. It also features several smart tools to track, analyze, and visualize scholarly research. It is a major competitor to Web of Science.
  • SciVal
    Based on the records in Scopus and analytics technology, SciVal provides overviews of research output at the institution level, allows for benchmarking with other organizations, helps in identifying collaboration partners, and analyzes research trends with citation and usage data.

Getting started:

  • Click Here to access Scopus and SciVal from within the JPL Network. (NOTE: You can also search remotely if you are connected via Pulse Secure!)
  • Introductory video and help resources: click Here to see a short video and other documentation.

A few quick notes:

  • To use the personalization features such as Alerts, MyList, and access SciVal, set up a userid and password. Otherwise, you can search the database without a userid.
  • You can download records and abstracts during the trial period.
  • Links to full text articles are NOT implemented during the trial period.

Questions and comments about Scopus and SciVal, please send to library@jpl.nasa.gov

There are a few questions we would especially like you to answer! Please take a few minutes to answer via this anonymous Survey. Thank you!

 

July 13, 12:00-1:00, Summer Movie: The Footsteps of Voyager

June 29th, 2016

The Footsteps of Voyager

The introduction of the Space Shuttles in the 1980s began a new era in America’s space program. At the same time, the legendary Voyager 2 was in the midst of its triumphant Grand Tour of the giant outer planets. Drawing on rare film footage and the memories of the engineers and scientists who were there, this 60-minute film brings alive the dramatic experiences of these first-ever encounters at Uranus and Neptune. As scientist Car Sagan declares in the film, those who designed, built and operate Voyager are “heroes of human accomplishment. Their deeds will be remembered in the history book.” And in this remarkable documentary.

 

 

July 6, 12:00-1:30, Summer Movie: The Stuff of Dreams

June 20th, 2016

The Stuff of Dreams

In late 2013, JPL’s Voyager 1 spacecraft reached the space between the stars—the first time a human-made object has ever gone beyond the breath of our sun’s wind. What is more is that, this is not the first “first” record that Voyager has made. Since their commencement in 1977, the twin Voyager spacecraft have made numerous “firsts”. However, what isn’t widely known is that the project almost never got off the ground.

Written, produced and directed by Blaine Baggett, JPL’s Director for Communications and Education, “The Stuff of Dreams” describes the challenges mission managers and the lab had to face developing and launching the twin Voyager spacecraft and operating them during the encounters with Jupiter and Saturn. Through first-hand accounts of those who were there, the film shows how the mission and JPL survived times of uncertainty and debate about the future of the U.S. space program and managed to fly the smartest robots of that age on the most ambitious planetary tour ever designed.

June 29, 12:00-1:30, Summer Movie: The Changing Face of Mars

June 20th, 2016

The JPL Library and Archives is screening a series of videos at the Hub during lunch time this Summer.   Beat the heat, bring your lunch, come to the Hub, and enjoy!

On June 29, we are showing “The Changing Face of Mars”.

The Changing Face of Mars

Of all the planets in our solar system, Mars has always held the most fascination. — This is the story of the first pioneering missions to reach Mars and how each encounter resulted in surprise, dismay or delight for those who first took us there.

Since the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Mariner 4 first visited the Red Planet in 1964, 38 more hopeful explorers around the world have been tasked with investigating Mars and challenging our beliefs about the mysterious planet. Only 15 of these missions have been successful, yet their findings have drastically altered our view of Mars.

This JPL – produced, 90-minute documentary is told through a mix of archival footage and interviews with the scientists and engineers who pioneered Mars exploration. It serves as the fourth installment of the Beginnings of the Space Age documentary series chronicling the evolution of space exploration since the first rockets were launched into space.

For more information about the movie and other Library and  Archives resources and services, please contact the JPL Library Reference Desk at ext 4-4200,  email library@jpl.nasa.gov., or leave a comment here.