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Restricted Rights Software

Restricted Rights Software:

  • Is computer software
  • Is typically third party products
  • Is developed at private expense (not with government funding)
  • Is commercial or financial in nature
  • Is typically confidential
  • May embody trade secrets

Restricted Rights Software is not:

  • Technical Data
  • Software produced as part of a JPL subcontract
  • Software produced by a JPL subcontractor in deliverance of a subcontract to be given to us without restriction

Limited Rights Data is described in the Federal Acquisition Regulation Rights in Data-General, 52.227-14.

JPL does not typically affix the restricted rights marking.  Third parties, including subcontractors and Caltech, when they produce software that was funded at private expense, affix the marking.

The restricted rights marking can be used in conjunction with JPL markings.

Marking Language:

Condition

Marking

Title Page (Subcontractor Generated): This computer software is submitted with restricted rights under Government Contract No. ________ (and subcontract ________, if appropriate). It may not be used, reproduced, or disclosed by the Government except as provided in paragraph (b) of this notice or as otherwise expressly stated in the contract.
All Subsequent Pages: This page contains restricted information and is subject to the restrictions on the title page of this document.

Marking Placement:

  • Documents with distinct pages: The title page marking goes at the top or bottom of the first page of each document, and the subsequent page marking goes at the top or bottom of all subsequent pages.  However, with this lengthy marking, one can simply do a title page as in the table above, and have a shorter reference to it on subsequent pages.
  • Documents without distinct pages: The title page marking goes at the beginning and end of each document.

Handling Requirements:

Restricted Rights information should be treated similarly to JPL/Caltech Proprietary information.

JPL personnel must protect limited rights information from unauthorized access and use, including via physical or visual access, electronic access, oral discussions, and in mailing/shipping and storage of information.

In addition, third-party information (from NASA and other sponsors; partners; and subcontractors) that has restrictive markings (such as limited rights information) must be handled in accordance with the third-party’s written access and use restrictions.

Software with the Restricted Rights marking may be shared with other JPL employees and with NASA civil servants with a reasonable need to know without any further actions, so long as they comply with the limitations contained in the Restricted Rights marking text.

To grant access to Restricted Rights software outside the scope summarized above, a prior written agreement must have been made to protect that information. For more information, see Prepare a Nondisclosure Agreement (Rule 65192).

Storage:

When left unattended, Restricted Rights software must be stored in a secure, access restricted environment. For example:

  • Electronic documents must be placed in restricted access location or be encrypted
  • Physical copies kept for reference or convenience must be shredded or destroyed via JPL Discreet Destruction

Transmission:

When sending Limited Rights information by mail, the document must be packaged in a sealed, opaque envelope or container with no markings to indicate that it contains restricted-access information.

Quoting Excerpts:

If you take an excerpt from a document marked Restricted Rights software, the new document must also be marked Limited Rights.

Changing the Marking:

The marking may be removed or updated only by the document author, or other delegated person. Check with the author (company or individual) or with the Contracts Management Section for additional information.

JPL StoriesJPL Stories

Mar 29, 4:00-5:00 PM, JPL Stories: Deborah Vane

March 6th, 2017

JPL Stories Presents:

A Near-Death Experience: Saving the CloudSat Spacecraft from a Severe Battery Anomaly

Vane

Presented by: Deborah Vane, CloudSat Project Manager

Wednesday, March 29th, 2017, 4:00-5:00 PM

@ the HUB, Building 111-104

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A battery anomaly in April 2011 drove the CloudSat spacecraft into its lowest-level of fault protection. This is a story of the technical challenges of the recovery and also of the human aspects of a long, protracted recovery effort. It is a story of team will-power, talent and perseverance, with the support of JPL and NASA management and not a small measure of luck. Learn how “DO-Op Rocks” became the CloudSat team mantra!

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The JPL Stories program, sponsored by the Library, Archives, and Records Section, celebrates the Lab’s unique environment and history, and provides an informal way for JPLers to share their stories with each other. For more information about the JPL Stories series, if you have a JPL story to tell, or if you have suggestions for future stories, contact Teresa Bailey, x49233.

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August 10, 4:00-5:00 PM, JPL Stories: Adam Steltzner

July 29th, 2016

JPL Stories Presents:

Time Changes All
My times at JPL in 3 acts and 4 stories

Presented by: Adam Steltzner, JPL Fellow, Mars 2020 Chief Engineer

Wednesday, August 10th, 2016, 4:00-5:00 PM

@ the HUB, Building 111-104

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I arrived at JPL and found myself feeling like a tiny cog in a gigantic machine. Almost 25 years later, I now find myself feeling like a caretaker of a magnificent but fragile machine. The tale of this transition unfolds in 3 acts and 4 stories.

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The JPL Stories program, sponsored by the Library, Archives, and Records Section, celebrates the Lab’s unique environment and history, and provides an informal way for JPLers to share their stories with each other. For more information about the JPL Stories series, if you have a JPL story to tell, or if you have suggestions for future stories, contact Teresa Bailey, x49233.

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June 28, 4:00-5:00 PM, JPL Stories: Justin Rennilson

June 14th, 2016

JPL Stories Presents:

SURVEYOR 1
The First Controlled Landing on a Celestial Body

Presented by: Justin (Jay) Rennilson, JPL and CIT Senior Research Fellow, now retired

Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 4:00-5:00 PM

@ the HUB, Building 111-104

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50 years ago this month a lonely spacecraft sat on the lunar surface, surprised by it’s success, as it scanned the distant landscape looking at rocks, craters and the sky above. The success of the Surveyor 1 controlled landing satisfied NASA that Apollo could land safely on the lunar surface with humans onboard. JPL, together with Hughes Space Systems, had overcome many problems to put that spacecraft on the moon. The story of that historic event has many interesting twists! Come hear Jay Rennilson, one of the original co-investigators on Surveyor’s Television experiment, recall those heady times.

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The JPL Stories program, sponsored by the Library, Archives, and Records Section, celebrates the Lab’s unique environment and history, and provides an informal way for JPLers to share their stories with each other. For more information about the JPL Stories series, if you have a JPL story to tell, or if you have suggestions for future stories, contact Teresa Bailey, x49233.

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June 8, 4:00-5:00 PM, JPL Stories: Julie Webster

May 24th, 2016

JPL Stories Presents:

Cassini’s Blaze of Glory Part II:
What will it take to get to the Grand Finale?
– and not too early!

Presented by: Julie Webster, Cassini Spacecraft Operations Manager

Wednesday, June 8, 2016, 4:00-5:00 PM

@ the HUB, Building 111-104

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Cassini’s Grand Finale is scheduled for September 15, 2017. But the ending really starts in late 2016 when Cassini’s orbit trajectory is changed to fly just outside Saturn’s “F” ring for 22 weeks. Then one final flyby of Titan moves the spacecraft inside Saturn’s rings for another 22 weeks – until its final plunge into Saturn’s atmosphere. What will it take to fly the Cassini spacecraft below the dusty rings, but above the atmosphere? How do we keep the spacecraft safe until the end? Come and hear the engineering challenges that will accompany the great science of the Grand Finale!

___

The JPL Stories program, sponsored by the Library, Archives, and Records Section, celebrates the Lab’s unique environment and history, and provides an informal way for JPLers to share their stories with each other. For more information about the JPL Stories series, if you have a JPL story to tell, or if you have suggestions for future stories, contact Teresa Bailey, x49233.

___

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May 18, 4:00-5:00 PM, JPL Stories: Linda Spilker

May 2nd, 2016

JPL Stories Presents:

Going out in a blaze of glory: Cassini’s Grand Finale

Presented by: Dr. Linda Spilker, Cassini Project Scientist

Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 4:00-5:00 PM

@ the HUB, Building 111-104

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___

Plunging into Saturn’s atmosphere at 74,000 mph the Cassini mission will end in a blaze of glory in the fall of 2017 rather than risk crashing into one of Saturn’s ocean-bearing worlds and potentially contaminating it. Cassini’s long mission has enabled some remarkable discoveries, and more are expected when Cassini repeatedly dives between the innermost ring and the top of Saturn’s atmosphere during its final six months. What new adventures await Cassini during its dramatic final act? What puzzles will Cassini solve before its fiery end? Come and hear the story of recent discoveries and how Cassini’s fast-paced, science-intensive “Grand Finale” will be like a whole new mission.

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The JPL Stories program, sponsored by the Library, Archives, and Records Section, celebrates the Lab’s unique environment and history, and provides an informal way for JPLers to share their stories with each other. For more information about the JPL Stories series, if you have a JPL story to tell, or if you have suggestions for future stories, contact Teresa Bailey, x49233.

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April 27, 4:00-5:00 PM, JPL Stories: Charles Elachi

March 21st, 2016

JPL Stories Presents:

What does the JPL Director really do? Reflections on the last 15 years

Presented by: Dr. Charles Elachi, JPL Director

NEW DATE Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 4:00-5:00 PM

@ the HUB, Building 111-104

___

The last fifteen years has be en a golden
age for space exploration. JPL launched
more than 20 missions and presently
operates 19 JPL missions. The outlook
for the next decade is even more exciting
and challenging. How did all of this happen?
Come get the inside scoop.

___

The JPL Stories program, sponsored by the Library, Archives, and Records Section, celebrates the Lab’s unique environment and history, and provides an informal way for JPLers to share their stories with each other. For more information about the JPL Stories series, if you have a JPL story to tell, or if you have suggestions for future stories, contact Teresa Bailey, x49233.

___

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April 27, 4:00-5:00 PM, JPL Stories: Charles Elachi

January 14th, 2016

JPL Stories Presents:

What does the JPL Director really do? Reflections on the last 15 years

Presented by: Dr. Charles Elachi, JPL Director

NEW DATE Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 4:00-5:00 PM

@ the HUB, Building 111-104

___

The last fifteen years has be en a golden
age for space exploration. JPL launched
more than 20 missions and presently
operates 19 JPL missions. The outlook
for the next decade is even more exciting
and challenging. How did all of this happen?
Come get the inside scoop.

___

The JPL Stories program, sponsored by the Library, Archives, and Records Section, celebrates the Lab’s unique environment and history, and provides an informal way for JPLers to share their stories with each other. For more information about the JPL Stories series, if you have a JPL story to tell, or if you have suggestions for future stories, contact Teresa Bailey, x49233.

___

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Sep 23, 4:00-5:00 PM, JPL Stories: John Callas

August 31st, 2015

JPL Stories Presents:

An Adventure with Spirit: the ultimate tale of an intrepid rover

Presented by: Dr. John Callas, Project Manager, Mars Exploration Rovers

Wednesday, September 23, 2015, 4:00-5:00 PM

@ the HUB, Building 111-104

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Contact was lost with Spirit on March 22, 2010 after six years of operation from this 90-day rover. The circumstances that ultimately led the loss began years before the rover’s end, with Spirit’s survival always in question. But it was those same challenges to survival that resulted in Spirit’s greatest discoveries. Come hear the story of survival and discovery on the surface of the Red Planet.

___

The JPL Stories program, sponsored by the Library, Archives, and Records Section, celebrates the Lab’s unique environment and history, and provides an informal way for JPLers to share their stories with each other. For more information about the JPL Stories series, if you have a JPL story to tell, or if you have suggestions for future stories, contact Teresa Bailey, x49233.

___

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July 22, 4:00-5:00 PM, JPL Stories: Larry James

July 1st, 2015

JPL Stories Presents:

The Early Days of GPS: My Time as a Shuttle Payload Specialist

browse_james

Presented by: Larry James, JPL Deputy Director

Wednesday, July 22, 2015, 4:00-5:00 PM

@ the HUB, Building 111-104

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GPS (Global Positioning System) is now an indispensable worldwide utility. However, the early days of GPS were both technically and politically challenging. Larry was selected as the Air Force Shuttle Payload Specialist to fly with the first operational GPS satellite. Come hear about the growth of GPS, the Payload Specialist program, and the impact the Challenger disaster had on the overall program.

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The JPL Stories program, sponsored by the Library, Archives, and Records Section, celebrates the Lab’s unique environment and history, and provides an informal way for JPLers to share their stories with each other. For more information about the JPL Stories series, if you have a JPL story to tell, or if you have suggestions for future stories, contact Teresa Bailey, x49233.

___

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July 15, 4:00-5:00, JPL Stories: JPL Visual Strategists

July 1st, 2015

JPL Stories presents:

“You Want to do What???”: And Other Questions That Artists Get When Working at JPL

The Studio_team photo_the studio

Presented by: The STUDIO

Liz Barrios | David Delgado | Dan Goods | Joby Harris | Jessie Kawata | Lois Kim

Wednesday, July 15, 2015, 4:00-5:00 PM

@ the HUB, Building 111-104

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From brainstorming new missions, to creating new facilities, to communicating with the public, art and design is being utilized at JPL in ways you may have never imagined. Come hear from members of The Studio at JPL and see what has been happening over the past few years.

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The JPL Stories program, sponsored by the Library, Archives, and Records Section, celebrates the Lab’s unique environment and history, and provides an informal way for JPLers to share their stories with each other. For more information about the JPL Stories series, if you have a JPL story to tell, or if you have suggestions for future stories, contact Teresa Bailey, x49233.

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How to Select a Landing Site on Mars

May 11th, 2015

Dr. Matt Golombek, Senior Research Scientist, will speak Wednesday June 2nd from 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. at the Hub, 111-104.

In the past 20 years, five successful landing sites on Mars have been selected based on a wide variety of remote sensing information and ground truth provided by surface observations. This talk will describe the challenges (what you don’t know can hurt you), the responsibilities (are you willing to risk hundreds of millions to billions of dollars on that interpretation?), and the joys (assuming the lander works and your predictions are correct) of selecting landing sites on Mars.

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Pluto: A long journey from Earth – A much, much longer journey from Washington

March 16th, 2015

Robert L. Staehle, Assistant Division Manager for Crazy Ideas, will speak Wednesday April 1st from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Hub, 111-104.

The mission to explore Pluto timeline: 10 minutes to hatch an idea, then… 14 years, 3 months, 18 days from idea to launch, then… 9 years, 5 months, 25 days from launch to encounter.

Come and hear the JPL story of how this mission found its way to the launch pad

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California’s Drought: Are We In or Out?

January 7th, 2015

Bill Patzert, Climatologist, will speak Wednesday January 28 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Hub, 111-104.

Patzert_Jan2015

“California’s history is written in great droughts,” Patzert says. As of December 2014, the ongoing California drought has turned more serious. Entering our 4th year of below-normal rainfall and snowpack, California faces its most severe drought emergency in decades. How did we get into this drought? Did a much advertised El Nino give us drought relief? How does drought impact the Southern California coastal marine environment? To find out how this story developed this winter, what happened to this drought and how we deal with future droughts, attend this talk!

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International Cooperation with the Rosetta Mission: Like a Down-Home Family Dinner

September 25th, 2014

Dr. Claudia Alexander, U.S. Rosetta Project Scientist, will speak Wednesday October 15 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Hub, 111-104.

AlexanderRosetta2014

With the Rosetta Mission, announced in 1995 and launched in 2004, the European Space Agency (ESA) realized the culmination of decades of effort seeking to understand the primordial material that formed our solar system. Along the way, ESA courted the participation of NASA, and embarked upon a challenging proposition – to land a spacecraft on a comet. Come along on the journey, as Claudia presents some of the enormous challenges of the Rosetta Mission, and how the relationships with NASA served the mission as a whole over three decades.

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Charles Darwin and the Future of JPL

September 2nd, 2014

Larry Dumas, former JPL Deputy Director, will speak Wednesday September 26 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Hub, 111-104.

As JPL looks toward the future, it may be helpful to consider how the Lab has evolved over the past 50 years. What were the environmental forces at work, and what were the attitudes and attributes that helped shape the Lab’s response? Are there lessons here for the future? Come hear Larry’s thoughts on these questions.

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Volcano Adventures on the Earth and Beyond

June 16th, 2014

Rosaly Lopes, JPL Senior Research Scientist and Planetary Science Section Manager, will speak Wednesday July 9 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Hub, 111-104.

Rosaly has a passion for volcanoes and a predilection for traveling to see eruptions, and encouraging others to do the same. Come hear about her volcano adventures on Earth, her work on the Galileo mission studying Io’s many active volcanoes, and her current research on the geology of Titan, including mysterious features that  may be ice volcanoes.

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History of the JPL Invention Challenge

May 8th, 2014

Paul MacNeal, Senior Mechanical Systems Engineer will speak Wednesday , May 21 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Hub, 111-104

Paul is the creator and organizer of the well attended annual JPL Invention Challenge. He will talk about how the event started and share his favorite stories from the sixteen year history of the contest.

To date, over 4000 middle school and high school students have participated in the engineering-based contest. Posters of each contest will be on display as a reminder of the variety of engineering challenges the students have faced over the years.

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Recovering Curiosity from the Jaws of Death

April 7th, 2014

On the Martian surface, the MSL Curiosity Rover was nearly lost due to a series of faults that culminated in the worst day any operations team could ever imagine. Come hear the tale of the how the operations team discovered and diagnosed the anomaly, and averted disaster.

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Robotic Deer, Purple Rocket Ships, and Vanity License Plates

November 14th, 2013

Robotic Deer, Purple Rocket Ships, and Vanity License Plates: A Conversation about Culture at JPL
In the summer of 2011, Luke Johnson set out to walk to every building on Lab in numerical order – a task that took 22 hours at a walking distance of 52.2 miles over 4 days. This curiosity-led experiment resulted in the creation of a map and smartphone app dubbed the Mysteries and Curiosities project.
Luke will tell the background story behind this project, focusing on the creativity, chutzpah, and entrepreneurial spirit required of design practices today (if not of all disciplines). He will also share his thoughts, from the lens of an artist/designer, on what it is like to communicate and understand a organization’s culture that is primarily focused on science.
Finally, Luke will share the latest installment of the Mysteries Project through three new projects that look at the Lab’s culture through three very different perspectives- that of children, summer interns, and the employees themselves.

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The Day We Lost Mars Observer

October 11th, 2013

Charles Whetsel, Manager of the Mars Program Formulation Office, (former Member of the Mars Observer Spacecraft Team Systems “Unit”) and Julie Webster, Cassini Spacecraft Operations Manager (former Lead of the Mars Observer Spacecraft Telecom Team). It has been more than 20 years since the loss of Mars Observer (MO) and it is high time to tell the story!

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